We Love What We Do

hear better, live better

Start shaping your new life today.

Schedule a Consultation

We Love What We Do

Hear Better, Live Better

Start Shaping Your New Life Today

Schedule a Consultation
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Hearing Tests

Our goal is to solve problems. Our testing helps us to do just that.

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Hearing Aids

Better hearing has improved the quality of life for millions of Americans.

Musician's Hearing Services

Custom services for musicians, hearing well is essential for their art. 

Tinnitus

Unwanted noises in one or both ears can dramatically impact your quality of life.

What makes our office unique?

We are an independently owned office that puts care of our patients first. Our comprehensive services are focused on evaluation, prevention, and treatment. It’s critically important in providing any health care service to have a thorough understanding of the problem before making any recommendations. We have no financial obligation to any hearing aid company which allows us make decisions based on your unique situation and needs. You, the patient, are our top priority!

Custom Earmolds & Hearing Protection

Unfortunately,  one size fits all earmolds don’t always fit.  A custom fit provides increased comfort and improved protection.  Custom earmolds can also be designed to accommodate specially designed filters created for specific listening situations.  We offer custom fit earmolds for swimmer’s, hunter’s, healthcare professionals and of course musician’s.

More About Custom Earmolds

The shape of your outer ear and ear canal are unique to you.

Earmolds are typically used for one of two reasons:

  • To keep things out (noise and water are the two big issues).
  • To keep things in (amplified sound from a hearing aid).

To obtain the maximum benefit from an earmold you need the best fit possible and that is exactly why we offer custom made earmolds.

  • Earmolds

    • iPod earbuds
    • Noise Protection
    • Musician’s ear plugs
    • Hunters earplugs for shooting
  • Custom Earmolds

    • iPod
    • Hunting
    • Musician
    • Swim Molds (for swimming or showering
    • Aural Rehabilitation Including TV Listeners and Amplified Telephones

Seminars & Presentations

We offer special presentations and seminars for hearing conservation programs for industrial OSHA compliance, employment screenings, school hearing screening, and educational seminars and consultations.

Hearing Aid Repair

We offer on-site and same day repair service for all makes and models of hearing aids.

Pediatrics

You’ve been told that your child needs to have their hearing checked.  This can be a scary time especially when your baby is just a few days old.  We understand how you’re feeling and rest assured we’ll promise to answer all your questions and to make sure your visit with us is as stress free as possible.

Regardless of your child’s age, there are safe, effective and accurate tests that can be used to determine how well your child hears.

More About Pediatrics

Infants and Toddlers

OAE testing may be utilized at this age if the child will tolerate the device in his ear for up to two minutes (the device is a small rubber tip and sometimes little ones just don’t want to still for 2 minutes!)

If a child will not tolerate headphones, sounds can be played through loudspeakers, however, only the better ear is tested, and a hearing loss in one ear may be unidentified.

Ages 3 – 4

At three to four years old the child can usually respond to a sound by placing a block in a bucket, pegs in a board, etc. With earphones on or in both ears, the child is taught to wait, listen, and respond.

Ages 5 and up

Most children once they reach the age of 5 can be tested using the same methods used with adults.

The identification and diagnostic process is closely linked with a comprehensive program of early intervention, insuring the availability of important auditory information during the early, critical years of hearing development.

Assistive Listening Devices (ALD)

Several types of ALDs are available to improve sound transmission for people with hearing loss. Some are designed for large facilities such as classrooms, theaters, places of worship, and airports. Other types are intended for personal use in small settings and for one-on-one conversations.

More About ALDs

What are assistive listening devices?

The terms assistive listening device or assistive listening technology can refer to any device that helps a person with hearing loss to communicate. These terms often refer to devices that help a person to hear and understand what is being said more clearly or to express thoughts more easily. With the development of digital and wireless technologies, more and more devices are becoming available to help people with hearing disorders to communicate more meaningfully and participate more fully in their daily lives.

What types of assistive listening devices are available?

Several types of ALDs are available to improve sound transmission for people with hearing loss. Some are designed for large facilities such as classrooms, theaters, places of worship, and airports. Other types are intended for personal use in small settings and for one-on-one conversations. All can be used with or without hearing aids or a cochlear implant. ALD systems for large facilities include hearing loop systems, frequency-modulated (FM) systems, and infrared systems.

What’s a telecoil?

A telecoil, also called a t-coil, is a coil of wire that is installed inside many hearing aids and cochlear implants to act as a miniature wireless receiver. It was originally designed to make sounds clearer to a listener over the telephone. It also is used with a variety of other assistive listening devices, such as hearing loop (or induction loop) systems, FM systems, infrared systems, and personal amplifiers.

The telecoil works by receiving an electromagnetic signal from the hearing loop and then turning it back into sound within the hearing aid or cochlear implant. This process eliminates much of the distracting background noise and delivers sound customized for one’s own need. For people who are hard-of-hearing who do not have a telecoil-equipped hearing aid or cochlear implant, loop receivers with headsets can provide similar benefits but without the customized or “corrected sound” feature that matches one’s hearing loss pattern.

Many cochlear implants have a telecoil built into the sound processor, or can use an external telecoil accessory with both hearing aid compatible telephones and public loop systems. A simple switch or programming maneuver performed by the user activates this function.

FM Systems

FM systems use radio signals to transmit amplified sounds. They are often used in classrooms, where the instructor wears a small microphone connected to a transmitter and the student wears the receiver, which is tuned to a specific frequency, or channel. People who have a telecoil inside their hearing aid or cochlear implant may also wear a wire around the neck (called a neckloop) or behind their aid or implant (called a silhouette inductor) to convert the signal into magnetic signals that can be picked up directly by the telecoil.

FM systems can transmit signals up to 300 feet and are able to be used in many public places. However, because radio signals are able to penetrate walls, listeners in one room may need to listen to a different channel than those in another room to avoid receiving mixed signals. Personal FM systems operate in the same way as larger scale systems and can be used to help people with hearing loss to follow one-on-one conversations.

Infrared Systems

Infrared systems use infrared light to transmit sound. A transmitter converts sound into a light signal and beams it to a receiver that is worn by a listener. The receiver decodes the infrared signal back to sound. As with FM systems, people whose hearing aids or cochlear implants have a telecoil may also wear a neckloop or silhouette inductor to convert the infrared signal into a magnetic signal, which can be picked up through their telecoil.

Unlike induction loop or FM systems, the infrared signal cannot pass through walls, making it particularly useful in courtrooms, where confidential information is often discussed, and in buildings where competing signals can be a problem, such as classrooms or movie theaters. However, infrared systems cannot be used in environments with too many competing light sources, such as outdoors or in strongly lit rooms.

Personal Amplifiers

Personal amplifiers are useful in places in which the above systems are unavailable or when watching TV, being outdoors, or traveling in a car. About the size of a cell phone, these devices increase sound levels and reduce background noise for a listener. Some have directional microphones that can be angled toward a speaker or other source of sound. As with other ALDs, the amplified sound can be picked up by a receiver that the listener is wearing, either as a headset or as earbuds.

What devices are available for communicating by telephone?

For many years, people with hearing loss have used text telephone or telecommunications devices, called TTY or TDD machines, to communicate by phone. This same technology also benefits people with speech difficulties. A TTY machine consists of a typewriter keyboard that displays typed conversations onto a readout panel or printed on paper.

Callers will either type messages to each other over the system or, if a call recipient does not have a TTY machine, use the national toll-free telecommunications relay service at 711 to communicate.  Through the relay service, a communications assistant serves as a bridge between two callers, reading typed messages aloud to the person with hearing while transcribing what’s spoken into type for the person with hearing loss.

With today’s new electronic communication devices, however, TTY machines have almost become a thing of the past. People can place phone calls through the telecommunications relay service using almost any device with a keypad, including a laptop, personal digital assistant, and cell phone. Text messaging has also become a popular method of communication, skipping the relay service altogether.

Another system uses voice recognition software and an extensive library of video clips depicting American Sign Language to translate a signer’s words into text or computer-generated speech in real time. It is also able to translate spoken words back into sign language or text.

Finally, for people with mild to moderate hearing loss, captioned telephones allow you to carry on a spoken conversation, while providing a transcript of the other person’s words on a readout panel or computer screen as back-up.

What types of alerting devices are available?

Alerting or alarm devices use sound, light, vibrations, or a combination of these techniques to let someone know when a particular event is occurring. Clocks and wake-up alarm systems allow a person to choose to wake up to flashing lights, horns, or a gentle shaking.

Visual alert signalers monitor a variety of household devices and other sounds, such as doorbells and telephones. When the phone rings, the visual alert signaler will be activated and will vibrate or flash a light to let people know. In addition, remote receivers placed around the house can alert a person from any room. Portable vibrating pagers can let parents and caretakers know when a baby is crying. Some baby monitoring devices analyze a baby’s cry and light up a picture to indicate if the baby sounds hungry, bored, or sleepy.

What research is being conducted on assistive technology?

Researchers are developing devices that help people with varying degrees of hearing loss communicate with others. One team of researchers has developed a portable device in which two or more users type messages to each other that can be displayed simultaneously in real time. Another team is designing an ALD that amplifies and enhances speech for a group of individuals who are conversing in a noisy environment.

Aural Rehabilitation

Aural rehabilitation or “aural rehab” is the process of identifying and diagnosing a hearing loss and then providing different types of therapies to patients who are hearing impaired. We use aural rehab in our practice as an important component in the overall care of our patients.

More About Aural Rehabilitation

Aural rehabilitation or “aural rehab” is the process of identifying and diagnosing a hearing loss and then providing different types of therapies to patients who are hearing impaired.

We use aural rehab in our practice as an important component in the overall care of our patients. We don’t just see our patients as a set of ears disconnected from the overall person. We know that there is much more to you than your hearing loss.
The goal of all aural rehab therapies is to assist anyone with a hearing loss to overcome or learn to compensate for any problems caused by a hearing loss.

Trust your hearing care to a practice that views you as an individual who happens to be hearing impaired and not just a set of ears.

The many different types of aural rehabilitation therapies:

  • Hearing aid orientation: The process of providing education and therapies to persons (individual or group) and their families about the use and expectations of wearing hearing aids to improve communication.
  • Listening strategies: The process of teaching someone who has a hearing loss different strategies when listening with or without amplification to improve their ability to communicate.
  • Speechreading: The process of using or teaching the understanding communication using visual cues observed from the speaker’s mouth, facial expressions, and hand movements.
  • Auditory Training: The process of teaching an individual with a hearing loss the ability to recognize speech sounds, patterns, words, phrases, or sentences via audition.
  • Unisensory: Therapy philosophy that centers on extreme development of a single sense for improving communication.

Steps included in an aural rehabilitation program for an adult:

  • Assessment and impact of hearing loss
  • Assessment for the use of hearing aids and or assistive listening devices
  • Assessment of listening strategies and speech reading skills
  • Developing a treatment program including the family
  • Delivery of the treatment program
  • Outcome measures

Treatment strategies for adults center on:

  • Hearing aids and or assistive listening device evaluation and orientation
  • Providing therapy to increase listening strategies and speech reading
  • Counseling to ease the adjustment to hearing aids and or assistive listening devices and the possible psychological, emotional, and occupational impacts of hearing loss

Hearing Conservation & Protection

Noise, or unwanted sound, is a pervasive occupational health problem. Exposure to high levels of noise can cause hearing loss.

More About Hearing Conservation

Noise, or unwanted sound, is a pervasive occupational health problem. Exposure to high levels of noise can cause hearing loss. The extent of damage depends primarily on the intensity of the noise and the duration of the exposure. Noise-induced hearing loss can be temporary or permanent.

Temporary hearing loss results from short-term exposure to noise, with normal hearing returning after period of rest. Generally, prolonged exposure to high noise levels over a period of time can gradually cause permanent damage. Did you know that sounds over 85 decibels are considered dangerous to your ears? Common everyday sounds, that you may not even be conscious of, can reach much higher than that and can damage your hearing.

At Cadence Hearing Services, we suggest limiting your exposure to loud sounds and using hearing protection products when you will be exposed for any length of time. Some of the sounds that may cause hearing loss include that should be limited should be limited in use or used along with hearing protection products:

  • Hair dryers- they can reach up to 92 decibels.
  • Lawn and yard equipment- up to 99 decibels.
  • Aerobics classes- up to 106 decibels.
  • Concerts (any type) – up to 120 decibels.
  • Movies (in the theatre) – up to 104 decibels.
  • Ambulance sirens- reach up 120 decibels.

In addition to hearing aids, Cadence Hearing Services offers hearing protection/noise reduction plugs that can help in the following situations:

  • In loud work environments.
  • For hunting and target shooting.
  • In motor sports.
  • In dentistry.
  • For musicians’.

We also would like to remind you to limit use of ear buds (or head phones) as they can cause damage. If you think you may already be losing your hearing and live near Doylestown or the Newtown/Langhorne area call on Cadence Hearing Services to schedule a hearing evaluation.

Frequently Asked Questions

If you have a question about your hearing, you’re not alone. Current estimates place the number of hearing impaired adults in the Unites States at just over 37 million.

who is more likely to experience hearing loss, men or women?
Men are more likely to experience hearing loss than women.
who is the typical person suffering from tinnitus?
Of adults ages 65 and older in the United States, 12.3 percent of men and nearly 14 percent of women are affected by tinnitus. Tinnitus is identified more frequently in white individuals and the prevalence of tinnitus is almost twice as frequent in the South as in the Northeast.
what percentage of American adults report hearing loss?
Approximately 17 percent of American adults report some degree of hearing loss
is there a connection between hearing loss and age?
There is a strong relationship between age and reported hearing loss: 18 percent of American adults 45-64 years old, 30 percent of adults 65-74 years old, and 47 percent of adults 75 years old or older have a hearing loss.
how does exposure to loud noise impact your hearing?
Approximately 15 percent (26 million) of Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have high frequency hearing loss due to exposure to loud sounds or noise at work or in leisure activities.

Our Approach

Our passion is to help our patients to hear better. Thorough, precise, and accurate advanced diagnostic examinations we can determine the best plan to improve your hearing. We are a full service hearing center, offering state-of‑the art technology and resources, ensuring that you are comfortable with your hearing journey.

Extensive continuing education and training, ensures that our staff is able to provide our patients and the community with the latest in hearing health care. Your relationship with our office will continue well beyond the initial visit and fitting. Your follow-up care includes ongoing office visits to make certain your hearing aids are providing the greatest benefit possible.

Don't Wait Any Longer. Start Your Path to Better Hearing Today!

Newtown/Langhorne Office

207 Corporate Drive East
Luxemborg Corporate Center
Langhorne, PA 19047

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Hours

M: 9:30AM – 6:00PM
T: 9:30AM – 5:00PM
Th: 9:30AM – 5:30PM

All Offices Contact

Doylestown Office

101 Progress Drive,
Doylestown, PA 18901

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Hours

W: 9:30AM – 6:00PM
F: 9:30AM – 3:00PM

Grandmother And Granddaughter Baking In Kitchen

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